absolution
we play with the toys the gods give us.

/

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

Hehe equality right?

Do you not understand the purpose of this, or why the prices are what they are? Does this need to be explained to you?

Oh yea right, the famous “wage gap” between men and women that has been debunked tons of times! That sure is the right argument to fight sexism with!

Not debunked, misrepresented, as it is a complicated issue. It’s honestly more accurate to call it a PAY gap than a WAGE gap, since there are a myriad of factors at play here. Women DO, on average, make less money than men. That is indisputable, and the margins widen when you include factors of race, disability, and sexuality. 

Here’s a good starter resource on it. 

IF you would like some more in depth reading:

This one is from Stanford about the Gender Pay Gap

This is a New York Times article looking at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s report on the topic.

This one is from the International Trade Union Confederation 

This one is from Oxford, titled Up the Down Staircase: Women’s Upward Mobility and the Wage Penalty for Occupational Feminization

You can also look at the US Census’s look at the Pay Gap

Or the Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Even the United States Government Accountability Office has some information on it.

So yes, the bake sale above is a pretty simplistic little stunt about a complicated economic and social issue. But the fact that it pisses people off sort of makes its point for it. 

(via youbestnotmiss)

jedavu:

Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Art

(via garrulus)

“ Often in literary criticism, writers are told that a character isn’t likable, as if a character’s likability is directly proportional to the quality of a novel’s writing. This is particularly true for women in fiction. In literature, as in life, the rules are all too often different for girls. There are many instances in which an unlikable man is billed as an antihero, earning a special term to explain those ways in which he deviates from the norm, the traditionally likable. The list, beginning with Holden Caulfield in The Catcher in the Rye, is long. An unlikable man is inscrutably interesting, dark, or tormented, but ultimately compelling, even when he might behave in distasteful ways. This is the only explanation I can come up with for the popularity of, say, the novels of Philip Roth, who is one hell of a writer but who also practically revels in the unlikability of his men, with their neuroses and self-loathing (and, of course, humanity) boldly on display from one page to the next.

When women are unlikable, it becomes a point of obsession in critical conversations by professional and amateur critics alike. Why are these women daring to flaunt convention? Why aren’t they making themselves likable (and therefore acceptable) to polite society? In a Publishers Weekly interview with Claire Messud about her novel The Woman Upstairs, which features a rather ‘unlikable’ protagonist, Nora, who is better, bereft, and downright angry about what her life has become, the interviewer said, ‘I wouldn’t want to be friends with Nora, would you? Her outlook is almost unbearably grim.’ And there we have it. A reader was here to make friends with the characters in a book and she didn’t like what she found.

Messud, for her part, had a sharp response to her interviewer.

For heaven’s sake, what kind of question is that? Would you want to be friends with Humbert Humbert? Would you want to be friends with Mickey Sabbath? Saleem Sinai? Hamlet? Krapp? Oedipus? Oscao Wao? Antigone? Raskolnikov? Any of the characters in The Corrections? Any of the characters in Infinite Jest? Any of the characters in anything Pynchon has ever written? Or Martin Amis? Or Orhan Pamuk? Or Alice Munro, for that matter? If you’re reading to find friends, you’re in deep trouble. We read to find life, in all its possibilities. The relevant question isn’t ‘Is this a potential friend for me?’ but ‘Is this character alive?’

Perhaps, then, unlikable characters, the ones who are the most human, are also the ones who are the most alive. Perhaps this intimacy makes us uncomfortable because we don’t dare be so alive. ”

—    Roxane Gay, Bad Feminist (via samanticshift)

(via youbestnotmiss)

nambroth:

Last night I found the "Fursona Generator" thanks to some Tumblr friends. I clicked through a few times and was laughing with tears streaming down my face.

My sense of humor is a bit warped.
Here are a few of the ones I got right away. Just super quick sketches— I needed to do something fun. I need to go back and hit it again for more inspiration later on.

(via latinkilledtheromans)

benshaws:

Game of Politics: It’s 2014 and Robert Baratheon is Prime Minister of Westeros.

Idris Elba as Robert Baratheon, Lupita Nyong’o as older Mya Stone, Aml Ameen as older Gendry Waters and Nathan Stewart-Jarett as older Edric Storm.

(via vestnix)

kawaiisharkchan:

moony-balloons:

micchi-monster:

prettysenshiconfessions:

I honestly am not thrilled that Naoko Takeuchi is working on Sailor Moon Crystal. I dislike a lot of the radically feminist tones of Crystal (I.e., the very blatantly feminist theme song, Tuxedo Mask being written out whenever possible), which I can only assume were her doing.

submitted by anon

I am legit crying with laughter.

Like, who has EVER looked at Sailor Moon and thought “nope, nothing feminist about this here story all about women who are strong and capable and kick ass in heels and nail polish.”?

And of course, Tuxedo Mask being written out of everything totally explains why he’s in every episode and gives Sailor Moon advice and strength, yup yup.

"I’m not thrilled that the creator of Sailor Moon is working on Sailor Moon"

op was apparently unaware that sailor moon is an anime about girls for girls and that mamoru has been a usless angst lump since 1991

(via youbestnotmiss)